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10 unknown facts about tea......

Updated: Aug 19, 2020

For nearly five thousand years, people have been enjoying tea. Discovered in China, it is currently the one of the most popular beverages worldwide,

Sometimes it’s sipped on the go, and other times it’s prepared in traditional ways, with great ceremony. There are many different varieties to choose from, there is a lot of history behind this beloved drink as well, much of which you may not know.

1. THE DISCOVERY

Originally used for medicinal purposes such as detoxification, it was often chewed rather than being drunk .

According to folklore, the beverage was first discovered accidentally when the leaves from some tea bushes blew into the water that servants were boiling, to purify it for Emperor Shen Nong to drink.

The leaves went unnoticed and the water was served to the emperor, who was also an herbalist. Upon drinking this accidental brew, which he very much enjoyed, the concept of drinking tea was born.

2 . THEY ARE ALL ONE

There are several different types including black, oolong, green, and white. They all come from the same plant, Camellia synesis, but the difference lies in how the leaves are treated after they are harvested

All tea leaves are withered, rolled, and heated. Different varieties are created depending on the additional steps, or in the timing of the steps, that are taken before the leaves are packaged.


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3. TEA OR TISANE?

Now that you know that there are only a few different types, you may be wondering about all of the other ones that you’re aware of, like peppermint or echinacea.

Well, hold on to your hats, people: these herbal drinks are technically not teas at all, but rather, something called a tisane.

Although the word tisane was originally used to describe a drink made from pearl barley,


4. THE MOST OXIDIZED TEA

Compared to other types of teas, black tea undergoes the most oxidation processes and for a good reason. Most of the tea experts believe that black tea is actually at the end of the spectrum for its ability to produce a more potent flavor. On the contrary, the white tea is on the opposite end of the spectrum such that it is the least oxidized.

5. THE CHAMPAGNE OF TEA

Grown in Darjeeling, India, the type of the same name is often referred to as the champagne of teas. It is a widely accepted belief that this particular black variety is the best of the best.

Grown in the Himalayas where the perfect climate for growing Camellia sinensis exists, the rocky mountain terrain makes it difficult to harvest. To gather Darjeeling leaves, pickers must battle the cold, the steep terrain, mists, and heavy rains.

6. MOST EXPENSIVE CUP

While Darjeeling can be quite expensive, it is not actually the most costly type to brew. That prize goes to a rare Chinese variety called Tieguanyin.

Named after the Buddhist Iron Goddess of Mercy, this oolong will cost you a pretty penny, at up to $1,500 per pound. But the good news is that the leaves can be brewed up to seven times before losing their unique flavor.


7. MOTHER OF INVENTION?

The teabag was invented in the United States in the early 20th century.

True lovers of this drink do not consider teabags to be a great invention, since they tightly pack the tea. This does not allow the leaves to expand while brewing, which enables the release of more of the compounds that are responsible for flavour, among other things.


8. RECORD-BREAKING BEVERAGE

As of the time of this writing, the largest teabag recorded by Guinness World Records weighed in at just over 551 pounds, and measured 9.8 feet wide by 13 feet high. It could be used to brew over 100,000 cups. Ahmed Mohamed Saleh Baeshen& Co., owner of Rabea Tea in Saudi Arabia, set this record in 2014.


9. HEAVIEST DRINKERS

China, Sri Lanka, and Kenya export the most tea worldwide, shipping out about 1 million metric tons of it between the three countries.

Thanks in large part to its huge population, China consumes the most of any country in total. However, per capita, Turkey, Ireland and the United Kingdom take the top three spots.

Over 3 billion cups are consumed worldwide each year.


10) YOU DID WHAT WITH IT?


There are some very interesting uses for this product beyond brewing. One such remedy is to rub slightly damp leaves on uncovered areas of skin, in order to keep mosquitoes away.

Tea has also been used for cleaning floors, naturally dyeing cloth, marinating meat, and for helping to patch up tiny nicks from shaving.

It’s often used for gardening purposes, too. Roses love the leaves, absorbing the nutrients that they offer through the soil. This makes a great addition to a compost pile, as it can accelerate the process of decomposition.

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